FoodHACCP Newsletter



Food Safety Job Openings

11/25. Food Safety & Qual Tech II - Eagle Grove, IA
11/25. HACCP Coordinator – Greenville, SC
11/25. Product Safety Reg Affairs – Plainsboro, NJ
11/23. Regional Food Safety Practitioner – Soledad, CA
11/23. Sanitation Professional/QA – Battle Creek, MI
11/23. Product Safety Reg Affairs - Plainsboro, NJ
11/22. Sanitation Manager, 3rd Shift - Easley, SC
11/22. Quality Supervisor - 2nd Shift - Caseyville, IL
11/21. Food Safety Manager - Des Plaines, Il
11/21. Food Safety Sanitation Specialist – Stockton, CA
11/21. QC Auditor – Produce - Sarasota, FL

11/28 2016 ISSUE:732

Your Food Is Making You Sick
Source : http://www.forbes.com/sites/peterlipson/2016/11/26/your-food-is-making-you-sick/#68d764071b38
By Peter Lipson (Nov 26, 2016)
I was listening to a call-in show on the radio this week and a listener from Colorado bragged about buying flour that was free of growth hormone and GMO’s. At first I laughed, and then I worried. Scientific ignorance is killing us. It allows climate change denialists to stop us from saving our home. It allows quacks and drug companies to sell fake cures. And it blinds us to the real problems in food safety.
So how can we know what the real dangers in food are? Is it better to buy organic or GMO-free or locally-sourced foods? The answer is actually pretty simple, much simpler than all the organic marketing and the GMO fights.
First is economics. In 2015, nearly 13% of U.S. households experienced food insecurity (the current term for “hunger”). Many more are forced to rely on poor quality foods that lead to obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure. Many poor Americans live in “food deserts.” They may want to purchase healthy foods, but there aren’t any grocery stores near enough, and they are forced to buy fast foods or unhealthy pre-packaged foods. So, being able to choose healthy foods is itself a privilege.
The 87% of us that aren’t going hungry are subjected to a flood of bad information about what is and what isn’t healthy.  Stores stock foods that are “GMO-free”, “hormone-free”, “gluten-free”, but the only thing most of these foods share is a hefty price tag.
A good starting point here is author Michael Pollan’s one line eating plan: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” By “food”, he means things that look like they came from the ground, or a ranch, or anyplace other than a factory. This makes things pretty simple.
If you’re worried about “hormones” in your meat, don’t. Just eat less meat. If you eat a few servings of meat every week, you’ll never get more than a few molecules of hormones in your food, if that. And the hormone-free, GMO-free flour that the Colorado baker was excited about? Wheat is a plant: you can’t feed it growth hormones. And none of the flour available to consumers is ground from GMO grains.
Health food hype is based purely on marketing and not on science. Much has been made of growth hormone in meat, and much of it is flat out wrong. If your chicken is advertised as “hormone-free”, make sure you aren’t paying a higher price, because no poultry in the U.S. is given hormones. Gluten-free is very popular right now, but even if you are one of the 1% of Americans with celiac disease, marketers are fooling you. Whole Foods sells “gluten-free” baby shampoo. First, please don’t eat baby shampoo. Second, gluten is a protein found in wheat. Meats, cheeses, and personal care products don’t normally have wheat in them.
But there are real risks in food, risks that require some science to understand and prevent. In the U.S., food-borne illness is a big threat, with 48 million Americans getting sick each year. Much of this is due to poor food handling starting in the fields and farms and going all the way to the final person to touch the food before it goes into your mouth. We do a terrible job in this country preventing infections we acquire from the meats and produce we eat. Preventing these requires good policies and good regulation. (Antibiotics in agriculture is a separate issue. Farmers use it to increase yield in meat, and the antibiotics get into our food chain, not hurting us directly, but decreasing our ability to use antibiotics to help humans.)
While we wait (and wait, and wait) for better food safety legislation and enforcement, there’s a lot you can do at home to prevent infections. The CDC’s guide to safe food handling is a good place to start. And scientific literacy, as always, is so important. Raw milk (milk that isn’t pasteurized) has been a growing fad for a number of years. With that fad has come a quadrupling of the number of outbreaks due to raw milk. An easy way to prevent infections is to stick to dairy that’s treated and handled properly, and to avoid food fads.
Eat food, not too much, mostly plants. Follow basic food handling safety guidelines. And learn to separate fact from fiction in food safety.

Navigating new food safety rules
Source : http://www.agrinews-pubs.com/news/navigating-new-food-safety-rules/article_44cf0fa6-5773-53cd-a3c9-8e38ca2a25af.html
SIU researcher seeks input from producers
By Karen Binder AgriNews Publications (Nov 27, 2016)
CARBONDALE, Ill. — One of the first steps in helping local food producers cope with new food safety laws is figuring out what information they need.
To accomplish this, Southern Illinois University researcher Ruplal Choudary is asking producers throughout southern Illinois to complete a 15-minute survey. Their responses will help guide Choudary’s work to provide training on the new Food Safety Modernization Act laws for producers in the coming year.
“Your feedback will help us in developing educational resources on specific content areas and determining the most effective approaches in disseminating the information,” the survey states.
It asks producers to simply rank their needs based on a variety of topics. Each of these topics has a number of safety rules assigned to them.
Topics for the FSMA rules include process control, sanitation, allergens, supply chain controls and recalls — all areas with new laws that food producers will have to comply with over the next several years.
The survey also asks producers to share how they would prefer to learn about the new laws and regulations. Choudary’s survey listed 14 ways, including online courses, YouTube videos, face-to-face workshops and handouts.
“There aren’t necessarily a lot of resources readily available in this area,” Choudhary said. “Food safety is vital. An advantage small producers and processors have is that, because they are smaller, they often have more control over their process and more direct contact with employees. So that will be our first focus — changing people’s habits.”
Local producers, farmers, food specialists and others attending the Local and Regional Foods Conference on Nov. 22 in Marion were among the first to respond to the survey.
Choudhary earned a pilot project grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture for $146,893 to help develop and implement training programs that will help small-scale producers and processors comply when the new rules apply to them in 2017 and 2018.
Choudhary has a three goals: to identify current food safety training programs in the area and the program gaps; to modify the curricula to teach the new regulations, emphasizing what is most relevant in the southernmost 24 counties; and to teach the courses to small growers and processors.
He’ll accomplish this with help from a small team including representatives from Rend Lake College, Shawnee Community College and University of Illinois Extension.
Choudhary is completing his own training in the new regulations. He is certified now as a lead instructor.
He plans to offer four face-to-face, low-cost training courses in the spring and summer, probably at SIU, Rend Lake College and Shawnee Community College for food processors and at least three sessions for Good Agricultural Practices certification for producers.

 

 

 

 

 


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State DOH to Hold Public Food Safety Code Hearings
Source : http://bigislandnow.com/2016/11/23/state-doh-to-hold-public-food-safety-code-hearings/
By Big Island Now (Nov 23, 2016)
The Hawai‘i State Department of Health will hold public hearings on Hawai‘i Island, Maui, O‘ahu, and Kaua‘i between Dec. 5 and 9, 2016 to introduce amendments to the Hawai‘i Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 50, Food Safety Code, which outlines standards for all food establishments statewide.
Hawai‘i Island Hearing Schedule
Hilo
Wednesday, Dec. 7 (2 to 5 p.m.)
Environmental Health Building Conference Room
1582 Kamehameha Ave., Hilo
Kona
Thursday, Dec. 8 (2 to 5 p.m.)
West Hawai‘i Civic Center, Bldg. G
74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway, Kailua-Kona
In February 2014, the state passed new food safety rules that significantly changed the food service inspection process by introducing the highly visible “stop-light” placarding system that displays the results of each inspection. The new state rules also adopted the 2009 US Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code as its basis, increased the frequency of permit requirements based on health risk, and increased permit fees to create an online database of inspection records for the public.
“The department is continuing to raise the state’s food safety standards by further updating regulations to increase the focus on prevention and reduce the risk of residents and visitors contracting foodborne illness,” said Peter Oshiro, head of the DOH Food Safety program. “Updating state requirements and fees and aligning our state with federal standards are essential for creating a world class food safety program in Hawai‘i.”
The proposed amendments include establishing a new food safety education requirement for persons in charge at all food establishments. The new rule will require at least one employee on every work shift be certified at the formal Food Handlers Training level. This will ensure a standard baseline of food safety knowledge for all establishment owners and managers. Studies have shown that food establishments with properly trained persons-in-charge have a lower occurrence of critical food safety violations that are directly linked to food illnesses.
The department is also proposing the adoption of the 2013 FDA Model Food Code. This will provide Hawai‘i with the most current nationally recognized food code based on the latest scientific knowledge on food safety. Updating the state’s food code will also align Hawaii with national standards and provide consistent requirements for food facilities that operate across multiple states.
Additional proposed changes to the state’s food safety rules include:
Removing the 20 days of sale limit for homemade foods (cottage foods) that are not considered a potential public health risk;
Removing the restriction on the number of days a Special Event Temporary Food Establishment permit may be valid;
Establishing a new fee structure for Temporary Food Establishment Permits ($100 for a 20-day permit plus $5 for each additional day over 20 to a maximum of one year);
Streamlining regulations for mobile food establishments (e.g. food trucks) by incorporating the requirements into existing rules for their base operations or “brick and mortar” establishments;
Revising the fee structure for mobile units with no increase to the total amount currently paid by a mobile operator;
Allowing placarding during all inspections;
Allowing the state to refuse permit renewal for non-payment of fines or stipulated agreements more than 30 days overdue; and
Requiring state approval for the sale of “Wild Harvested Mushrooms.”
The draft rules are available for review online. Written public comments are recommended and may be submitted at the public hearings or to the Sanitation Branch at 99-945 Halawa Valley St., Aiea, HI 96701 prior to the close of business on Friday, Dec. 16, 2016.
Public hearings on the proposed rules will be held on other Hawaiian Islands as well:
O‘ahu
Monday, Dec. 5 (2 to 5 p.m.)
Environmental Health Services Division
Food Safety Education Room
99-945 Halawa Valley St., Aiea
Maui
Tuesday, Dec. 6 (2 to 5 p.m.)
UH-Maui College Community Services Building
310 Kaahumanu Ave., Bldg. 205, Kahului
Kaua‘i
Friday, Dec. 9 (2 to 5 p.m.)
Lihue Health Center Conference Room
3040 Umi St., L?hue

Food safety on Thanksgiving eve
Source : http://www.kotatv.com/content/news/Food-safety-on-Thanksgiving-eve-402761686.html
By  Helene Duhamel (Nov 23, 2016)
If you have waited this long to thaw your frozen turkey, or if you just bought it, your only choice is to leave it in the refrigerator overnight. On Thanksgiving morning you have to start giving it cold water baths.
Keep the turkey wrapped in plastic and soak in cold water for 30 minutes per pound.
The experts at butterball advise:
·Thaw breast side down, in an unopened wrapper, with enough cold water to cover your turkey completely.
·Change water every 30 minutes to keep the turkey chilled.
·Estimate a minimum thawing time of 30 minutes per lb. So for a 20 pound turkey, that would be 10 hours!
Cook your turkey to a safe 165 degrees internal temperature.
Regarding left-overs, do not leave them out during the football game. Cover and refrigerate after your meal. Freeze or throw out after four days.
Cooking fires and food poisoning are your two big health risks on Thanksgiving. Be safe and have an enjoyable holiday!

It’s Thanksgiving Eve, have you calibrated your thermometer?
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2016/11/its-thanksgiving-eve-have-you-calibrated-your-thermometer/#.WDuYifmLSUl
BY MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION (Nov 23, 2016)
Editor’s note: A shorter version of this article originally was published by Michigan State University Extension. To contact an expert in your area, visit http://expert.msue.msu.edu, or call 888-MSUE4MI (888-678-3464).
Make sure to purchase — or dig up — your bimetallic, stemmed, instant-read thermometer before you put the bird in the oven. Calibrating your thermometer is equally as important as actually using it to check the internal temperatures of the turkey and stuffing.
Using a calibrated food thermometer is the only reliable way to ensure the food is safe to eat.
You must cook all poultry to a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit as measured with that calibrated food thermometer.
Check the internal temperature in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast. For optimum safety, do not stuff poultry. If stuffing whole poultry, the center of the stuffing must also reach a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees F.
To properly use a food thermometer, the thermometer probe must be inserted the full length of the sensing area (usually 2 to 3 inches up the thermometer stem).  Always refer to manufacturer’s instructions if you have questions regarding your specific thermometer.
Calibration counts
Before using the thermometer on Thanksgiving morning, calibrating the thermometer is an important step to take. Many food thermometers have a calibration nut under the dial that can be adjusted. Check the package for instructions. To calibrate using the ice point method is very simple with these steps:
Fill a large glass with crushed ice;
Add water to the top of the ice and stir well;
Place the stem of the food thermometer at least 2 inches into the ice water without touching the sides or the bottom of the glass;
Wait a minimum of 30 seconds before adjusting; and
Without removing the stem from the ice, hold the adjusting nut under the head of the thermometer and turn the head so the arrow reads 32 degrees F.

Forgot to Thaw the Turkey? Here are Three Solutions
Source : https://foodpoisoningbulletin.com/2016/forgot-to-thaw-the-turkey-here-are-three-solutions/
By News Desk (Nov 23, 2016)
The USDA has some tips about how to thaw your turkey quickly for Thanksgiving dinner. It should be thawed in the refrigerator; but this can take days. In fact, a 16 pound turkey takes four days to thaw. If your turkey is still frozen, it’s too late to use this method.
The two methods for thawing a turkey quickly are the cold water method an the microwave method. If you use these methods, you have to cook the turkey immediately after it thaws.
For the cold water method, leave the turkey in its original wrapping and submerge it in a sink or container full of cold water. Change the water eery 30 minutes by emptying out the sink or container and replacing it with fresh cold water. This takes some commitment: to thaw a 16 pound turkey will take 8 hours to thaw, allowing 30 minutes of defrosting time per pound. If you want to eat in the afternoon, you need to start this process around 4:00 am Thanksgiving morning.
To thaw in the microwave oven, make sure the turkey will fit in it. You owner’s manual should have instructions for how to use this appliance to thaw the turkey. Find out how many minutes per pound it will take and the power level to use. Remove outside wrapping and put the turkey on a microwave-safe dish that is big enough to hold the bird and any juices that will leak out of the turkey. Allow about 6 minutes per pound to thaw a turkey. Rotate the bird several times and flip it to make sure the thawing process is even.
If the turkey starts to cook in the microwave, take it out and let it stand for 5 minutes before you continue thawing. You can cover the tips of the wings and the drumsticks with pieces of foil to shield them from the microwaves about halfway through the thawing process.
If your turkey is frozen sold and you don’t want to commit to these procedures, you can cook the turkey from the frozen state. This method is very easy and safe and produces a very nice result. The turkey will take at least 50% longer to cook through. You can also use this method if the turkey is partially frozen. Always use a meat thermometer. When the turkey measures 165°F in the innermost part of the thigh, the innermost part of the wing, and the thickest part of the breast, it is done.
And here’s how NOT to thaw a turkey: on the counter, in the garage, or on the back porch. Never thaw a turkey in a brown paper grocery bag or plastic garbage bag. Don’t use the dishwasher to thaw a turkey, with or without water.

State to hold statewide public hearings on changes to food safety code
Source : http://khon2.com/2016/11/22/state-to-hold-statewide-public-hearings-on-changes-to-food-safety-code/
By Web Staff (Nov 22, 2016)
The Hawaii State Department of Health will hold public hearings on Hawaii Island, Maui, Oahu, and Kauai from Dec. 5-9 to introduce amendments to the Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11, Chapter 50, Food Safety Code, which outlines standards for all food establishments statewide.
In February 2014, the state passed new food safety rules that significantly changed the food service inspection process by introducing the highly visible “stop-light” placarding system that displays the results of each inspection.
The proposed amendments include establishing a new food safety education requirement for persons-in-charge at all food establishments. The new rule will require at least one employee on every work shift be certified at the formal Food Handlers Training level.
This will ensure a standard baseline of food safety knowledge for all establishment owners and managers. Studies have shown that food establishments with properly trained persons-in-charge have a lower occurrence of critical food safety violations that are directly linked to food illnesses.
The department is also proposing the adoption of the 2013 FDA Model Food Code. This will provide Hawaii with the most current nationally recognized food code based on the latest scientific knowledge on food safety.
Updating the state’s food code will also align Hawaii with national standards and provide consistent requirements for food facilities that operate across multiple states.
Additional proposed changes to the state’s food safety rules include:
Removing the 20 days of sale limit for homemade foods (cottage foods) that are not considered a potential public health risk;
Removing the restriction on the number of days a Special Event Temporary Food Establishment permit may be valid;
Establishing a new fee structure for Temporary Food Establishment Permits ($100 for a 20-day permit plus $5 for each additional day over 20 to a maximum of one year);
Streamlining regulations for mobile food establishments (e.g. food trucks) by incorporating the requirements into existing rules for their base operations or “brick and mortar” establishments;
Revising the fee structure for mobile units with no increase to the total amount currently paid by a mobile operator;
Allowing placarding during all inspections;
Allowing the state to refuse permit renewal for non-payment of fines or stipulated agreements more than 30 days overdue; and
Requiring state approval for the sale of “Wild Harvested Mushrooms.”
Click here for the draft rules.
Written public comments are recommended and may be submitted at the public hearings or to the Sanitation Branch at 99-945 Halawa Valley St., Aiea, Hawaii 96701 prior to the close of business on Friday, Dec. 16.
Public hearings on the proposed rules will be held on:
Oahu
Monday, Dec. 5 (2 – 5 p.m.)
Environmental Health Services Division Food Safety Education Room 99-945 Halawa Valley St., Aiea
Maui
Tuesday, Dec. 6 (2 – 5 p.m.)
UH-Maui College Community Services Building 310 Kaahumanu Ave., Bldg. #205, Kahului
Hawaii Island
Wednesday, Dec. 7 (2 – 5 p.m.)
Environmental Health Building Conference Room 1582 Kamehameha Ave., Hilo
Thursday, Dec. 8 (2 – 5 p.m.)
West Hawaii Civic Center, Bldg. G 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway, Kailua-Kona
Kauai
Friday, Dec. 9 (2 – 5 p.m.)
Lihue Health Center Conference Room 3040 Umi St., Lihue

Calling All New Sea Hawaii Victims: Settlement reached in 2013 Bronx Hepatitis A Lawsuit
Source : http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/calling-all-new-sea-hawaii-victims-settlement-reached-in-2013-bronx-hepatitis-a-lawsuit/#.WDu7RPmLSUl
By BILL MARLER (NOV 22, 2016)
Successful class action lawsuit seeks beneficiaries of $200,000 settlement
A settlement has been reached in the class action lawsuit against New Hawaii Sea Restaurant, formerly of the Bronx, New York. Approximately 3,000 people received Hepatitis A vaccinations after being exposed to the illness by the restaurant in September 2013 and all are included in the class-action lawsuit.
The deadline for applying to receive a portion of the $200,000 settlement is December 16th, 2016.  Those interested in benefiting from the class action settlement should visit www.NewHawaiiHepA.com for more information.
According to the settlement, potential class members who may benefit by this settlement include anyone who ate or drank food from the New Hawaii Sea Restaurant from September 7-19, 2013, or were exposed to someone who did, and obtained a blood test and immune globulin (IG) or Hepatitis A vaccination shot within 30 days of eating at the restaurant. Those who actually developed Hepatitis A infections after eating at the restaurant are not included in this settlement.
Bill Marler of Marler Clark LLP, an expert on Hepatitis outbreaks, is available for comment on the outcome of the case. Marler is the nation’s premiere legal expert on foodborne illness and has represented victims of various foodborne illnesses. If you would like to speak with Mr. Marler, please contact Colleen McMahon (colleen@quinnbrein.com), Samantha Jones (sam@quinnbrein.com), or call (206) 842-8922.
Marler Clark, LLC has been an advocate for victims of foodborne illnesses for decades, and have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illnesses.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Marler Clark attorneys have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods. The firm has brought lawsuits against companies such as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.
If you would like more information regarding the New Sea Hawaii outbreak and settlement, or would like to schedule an interview with an expert from Marler Clark, please contact Colleen McMahon (colleen@quinnbrein.com), Samantha Jones (Sam@quinnbrein.com) or call (206) 842-8922.

Food safety must be a priority over the holidays
Source : http://www.springfieldnewssun.com/news/news/local/food-safety-must-be-a-priority-over-the-holidays/ntCWr/
By Larry Shaffer (Nov 22, 2016)
Everyone loves good food. Surely, that’s one of the reasons we all enjoy the holiday season. It’s a time of year when we gather and agree to forgive ourselves for over-indulgence.
It’s also a time to remember to not let food-borne illness ruin the party. Each year, 1 in 6 Americans gets sick by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. Too often, these sources of illness are foods prepared at home.
The good news is that there are things we can do to make sure our memory of holiday feasts remains good.
For those of us who would rather sit on the couch watching the game or our favorite holiday movie while someone else slaves in the kitchen, we now have a reason, even if we have to fake it a little. One of the most common causes of food contamination is a sick cook. It may seem obvious, but symptoms such as fever, vomiting, and diarrhea have no place in the kitchen. Too many of us take an unnecessary risk. Let someone else prepare the food or order take-out.
OK, so you’re not sick and you love to share the results of your culinary skills. There are some things you should do to keep everyone smiling long after they have gloated over the gravy. While those rings are one of your biggest sources of joy, jewelry has tiny nooks that make it impossible to scour away harmful bacteria with simple handwashing. So take them off and keep them shiny until it’s time to eat. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and running water for at least 15 to 20 seconds and use a brush under your nails. Do this before you start and every time immediately after doing things like handling raw meat or washing dishes.
Having the latest kitchen gadgets is fun, but an accurate food thermometer is the best tool to make sure the turkey or roast is safe and not dried and chewy like leather. Every package of fish, meat or poultry has a label with safe handling instructions that include safe cooking temperatures. Use your thermometer in the thickest parts of the food to cook until the safe temperature is achieved without overcooking. Check the accuracy of your thermometer by carefully checking the temperature of boiling water. If your thermometer does not read 212 degrees Fahrenheit, follow the manufacturer’s instructions to correct it or get a new one.
We all love to snack on the relish tray until it is time for the main event. Always wash cutting boards after using them for raw meats and poultry and before cutting raw vegetables. And since you’re already washing things, wash the vegetables before you cut them. After all, these things did come from an open field with birds flying around and critters crawling all over the place.
It’s a day or two ahead of the big feast and you’re already thinking of how proud you’ll be to watch everyone delight as they fawn over your egg nog and meringue pie. Your secret recipes include raw eggs which may be contaminated with salmonella. To keep those fawns from turning into groans, use a pasteurized egg product instead of raw eggs.
Dinner is over and your guests are saluting you with kudos. You’d love to sit down and relax with them but you can’t. You have taken an oath to food safety and your devotion requires you to package the leftovers in smaller containers that cool more quickly and put them in the refrigerator right away so that harmful bacteria doesn’t grow. It’s at this point that you justify eating everything now for the sake of protecting your family from those potentially dangerous leftovers.
Larry Shaffer is director of Environmental Health for the Clark County Combined Health District.

STOP Foodborne Illness to honor Food Safety Heroes
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2016/11/stop-honors-food-safety-heros/#.WDu7_PmLSUl
BY NEWS DESK (NOV 22, 2016)
STOP Foodborne Illness, the Chicago-based national advocacy and education organization, will honor three Food Safety Heroes at a fundraising event being held Dec. 6 from 7-9 p.m.
The awards will be given during the Food Safety Consortium at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center, 1551 Thoreau Drive N., Schaumburg, IL. The benefit is open to the public.
Guests will enjoy live jazz, cocktails and hors d’oeuvres in celebration of three exceptional individuals who have had an impact on making food safer for everyone, the group announced. Tickets are $65 per person and can be purchased here.
About the honorees
Jeff Almer of Savage, MN, will be accepting the STOP Foodborne Illness 2016 Legacy Tribute award in memory of his mother, Shirley, who died from Salmonella in 2008.
Dr. Robert Tauxe of Atlanta, GA, director of CDC’s Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, will be honored as the STOP Foodborne Illness 2016 Advancing Science for Food Safety Hero.
Scott Horsfall of Sacramento, CA, on behalf of the California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement (LGMA), will be recognized as the STOP Foodborne Illness 2016 Excellence in Food Safety Training Hero.
For more about the event and the three Food Safety Heroes being honored, go here.
STOP Foodborne Illness is a national nonprofit public health organization dedicated to preventing illness and death from foodborne pathogens by advocating for sound public policies, building public awareness and assisting those impacted by foodborne illness.

Consumer Food Safety Knowledge Up – But There's Room to Grow
Source : http://www.qualityassurancemag.com/article/consumer-food-safety-knowledge-up-but-there-is-room-to-grow/
By qualityassurancemag.com (Nov 22, 2016)
For nearly 30 years, FDA in partnership with USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has conducted annual food safety surveys to gauge and track the public’s understanding of proper food safety handling techniques.
For nearly 30 years, FDA in partnership with USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has conducted annual food safety surveys to gauge and track the public’s understanding of proper food safety handling techniques. Between October 6, 2015, and January 17, 2016, the FDA surveyed 4,169 Americans ages 18 and older to learn more about consumers’ attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge of food safety.
The survey questions are designed to measure trends in consumer food safety practices, such as hand and cutting-board washing; preparing and consuming potentially risky foods; and using food thermometers. In addition to informing the FDA’s food safety education efforts, the results are used by the Healthy People 2020 initiative to track consumer food safety knowledge and actions.
Key findings of the survey were:
Food thermometer ownership rates have remained constant, but usage has slightly increased – In 2016, 67% of respondents reported owning a food thermometer. Reported usage has increased for roasts, chicken parts, and hamburgers between 2006 and 2016. In 2016, 38% report that they always use a meat thermometer for roasts, compared to 19% for chicken parts, and 10% for hamburgers.
After increasing between 2006 and 2010, handwashing rates have remained constant or decreased between 2010 and 2016. FDA asked about handwashing before preparing food, after handling raw meat or poultry, after handling raw fish, and after cracking raw eggs. In all years, consumers are more likely to report washing hands with soap after touching raw meat or raw fish, than before preparing food, or after cracking raw eggs. The percent who report washing with soap after touching raw meat or raw fish has remained constant since 2010 at 85%. There was a slight decrease in the percent who report washing with soap all the time before preparing food from 78% in 2010 to 75% in 2016. Similarly, there has been a decline in the percent who report washing with soap after cracking raw eggs from 48% in 2010 to 43% in 2016.
Most consumers do not wash their hands after using handheld phones or tablets in the kitchen. About half of consumers use devices such as smartphones or tablets while preparing food, but only about a third of those report washing their hands with soap after touching the device while preparing food. This is a new finding and points to the need for additional research to better understand how technology is used in the kitchen.
For more information, see:
2016 Food Safety Survey Report and Presentation
Food Safety Education Materials
Consumer Behavior Research
2010 Food Safety Survey: Key Findings and Topline Frequency Report
UK study: Juices from bagged salad can encourage Salmonella
Source : http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2016/11/uk-study-juices-from-bagged-salad-can-encourage-salmonella/#.WDu8M_mLSUl
BY NEWS DESK (NOV 22, 2016)
A recent study by researchers at the University of Leicester found that traces of salad green juices released when the leaves become damaged can significantly encourage the growth of Salmonella enterica.
The researchers reported that they concentrated on Salmonella because it is “an aggressive pathogen that has been implicated in salad-associated infections.” Their work was posted online Nov. 18 by the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.
“We found that juices released from the cut-ends of the salad leaves enabled the Salmonella to grow in water, even when it was refrigerated — this was a surprise as Salmonella has a temperature preference of 37 C,” according to the study.
The research team consisted of Giannis Koukkidis, Richard Haigh, Natalie Allcock, Suzanne Jordan and Primrose Freestone, who are all affiliated with the University of Leicester in Leicester, England.
Other findings from their research were that salad leaf juices enhanced attachment of the pathogen to the plastic bag and that over a five-day period, which researchers noted was the typical storage time for bagged salad, even traces of the juice in salad bag fluids increased Salmonella growth in water by up to 280 fold over control cultures.
“Collectively, this study shows that exposure to salad leaf juice may contribute to the persistence of Salmonella on salad leaves, and strongly emphasizes the importance of ensuring the microbiological safety of fresh produce,” the researchers wrote.
Previously, little had been understood about how Salmonella bacteria behave within the confines of a salad bag, despite the increasing risk of foodborne illness from Salmonella enterica and other pathogens, they added.
“Salad juice exposure also helped the Salmonella cells to attach to the salad leaves so strongly that washing could not remove them. Collectively, this study shows that exposure to even traces of salad leaf juice may contribute to the persistence of Salmonella on salad leaves as well as priming it for establishing an infection in the consumer,” said Freestone, a senior lecturer in clinical microbiology and an author of the study.
She noted that there have been several illness outbreaks linked to salad greens and involving Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli.
For example, bean sprouts contaminated with Salmonella infected more than 100 people in the U.S. in 2014, at least 50 people in Australia developed salmonellosis in February of this year after eating bagged salad and, in July, 161 people were sickened and two died in the U.K. after eating mixed salad.
According to 2013 data from the European Food Safety Authority, salad greens are the second most common source of foodborne illness in the European Union.
Freestone stressed that the research “does not indicate any increased risk to eating leafy salads” but that it does point out the continuing need for vigilant food safety practices in the production and preparation of salad greens.
“With regards to eating leafy salads, which are a nutritious part of the diet, they should be stored, prepared and used according to the guidance on the pack — including refrigeration and use-by instructions,” she said. “Avoid bags of salad with mushed-up leaves, avoid any bags or salad containers that look swollen, store in the fridge and use the salad as quickly as possible after purchase to minimize the growth of any pathogens that might be present.”
Additional research involving pathogens that may inhabit bagged salads is being planned by University of Queensland researchers in partnership with Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited.
They intend to spend $800,000 over two years to see whether probiotics, in the form of lactic acid bacteria, can be introduced to such products to help reduce the possibility of outbreaks caused by Salmonella and Listeria.
Professor Mark Turner from the university’s School of Agriculture and Food Sciences said that more than 300 people in Australia were sickened this year in outbreaks linked to bagged salads and sprouts.
“Our project aims to commercialize new strains of bacteria that already naturally occur on veggies,” he said. “These can assist salad producers improve the food safety and health benefits of their fresh and fresh-cut salad products, adding value to them and protecting the health of consumers.”
Other University of Queensland researchers working with Turner include Paul Dennis, Bhesh Bhandari, Nidhi Bansal, Sangeeta Prakash and Van Ho.

 

 

Internet Journal of Food Safety (Operated by FoodHACCP)
[2015] Current Issues

Vol 17.64-74
Sanitation and Hygiene Meat Handling Practices in Small and Medium Enterprise butcheries in Kenya - Case Study of Nairobi and Isiolo Counties
Sharon Chepkemoi, Peter Obimbo Lamuka, George Ooko Abong’ and Joseph Matofari

Vol 17.25-31
Combined Effect Of Disinfectant And Phage On The Survivality Of S. Typhimurium And Its Biofilm Phenotype
Mudit Chandra, Sunita Thakur, Satish S Chougule, Deepti Narang, Gurpreet Kaur and N S Sharma

Vol 17.21-24
Quality analysis of milk and milk products collected from Jalandhar, Punjab, India
Shalini Singh, Vinay Chandel, Pranav Soni

Vol 17.10-20
Functional and Nutraceutical Bread prepared by using Aqueous Garlic Extract
H.A.R. Suleria, N. Khalid, S. Sultan, A. Raza, A. Muhammad and M. Abbas


Vol 17.6-9
Microbiological Assessment of Street Foods of Gangtok And Nainital, Popular Hill Resorts of India
Niki Kharel, Uma Palni and Jyoti Prakash Tamang


Vol 17.1-5
Assessment of the Microbial Quality of Locally Produced Meat (Beef and Pork) in Bolgatanga Municipal of Ghana
Innocent Allan Anachinaba, Frederick Adzitey and Gabriel Ayum Teye


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